AMERICAN THEATRE MAGAZINE 

September 2018

ROLE CALL Series / PEOPLE TO WATCH

6 THEATRE WORKERS YOU SHOULD KNOW

Judge  

Sanja Manakoski

The Driehaus Awards for Fashion Excellence

April 2018

Dressing The Part

QUIXOTE: ON THE CONQUEST OF SELF

Interview

Sanja Manakoski

-The Hawk Chicago " Sanja Manakoski’s costume design for Quixote was incredible in its intricacy, crafting armor that looked traditional at first glance but, upon closer inspection, revealed modern elements weaved throughout. Beer cans, for instance, make up one of the plates, with license plates filling in a gap elsewhere. The effect perfectly blended the show’s classic vs modern aesthetic. "

                                                                                                          

-Conversations with Ed Tracy " Sanja Manakoski has created an ingeniously adaptable costume design."

                                                                                          

-Chicago Sun Times "Lying on the floor, encased in a crazy patchwork suit of armor (a wonderful costume by Sanja Manakoski), his legs are in mid-air, and like a tortoise struggling to right himself, he tries desperately to grab hold of a book that is just out of reach."                                                                                                                                           

 -Daily Herald "And Godinez amazingly does all this in costume designer Sanja Manakoski's grab-bag suit of armor -- made up of slogan buttons, bits of old tires, cutup license plates and more to symbolically reinforce how the well-traveled "Don Quixote" has survived through the ages."

                                                                                                                     

-Chicago Stage Standard " It is exciting to see him (Henry Godinez) hurl his body through space in Sanja Makakoski’s magnificent found art steampunk armor costume of Budweiser cans, pop tops and license plates."

                                                                                                    

-Chicagoland Theater Reviews "Godinez introduces himself to the audience dressed in a medieval suit of armor that visually captures the fictional Don Quixote in all his deluded splendor... Sanja Manakoski designed the costumes."

                                                                                         

-Chicago Tribune " Godinez is kitted out in metallic, timeless knight-trashheap attire that includes beer caps, bent license plates and other detritus. " 

                                                                                                                 

 -New City Stage " Garbed in designer Sanja Manakoski’s inspired suit of “armor’–an assemblage of flattened beer cans, bottle caps and old license plates–Godinez effortlessly conveys the heroic, addlepated essence of the Lord of La Mancha, the starry-eyed dreamer who longs to translate his pinched, mundane existence into the gallant realm of epic romance."

                                                                                                                   

 -Around the Town Chicago " Godinez is absolutely “stunning” in his portrayal of this character that has been around since the 1600’s."

 "...Mr. Godinez’ costume (Sanja Manakoski) stunning..."

                                                                                              

-Theater Critic; Hyde Park Herald "Embodied by Henry Godinez in a larger-than-life tour de force performance, we first see him—in costume designer Sanja Manakoski’s fantastical “armor” incorporating everything from old coins to mangled license plates—in an impossibly contorted position, Cervantes’ book lying open next to him." 

                                                                                     

Hedwig Dances brings Bauhaus utilitarianism to the stage
Chicago Reader "Sanja Manakoski’s costumes deconstruct and transform the dancers' bodies, and Bartoszek's core themes are reflected in a cocoonlike garment that breaks apart into pieces. It's a visual metaphor for Bauhaus's revolutionary ideology, and Futura explores the beauty of building blocks."

THE BOXED-IN PLAYERS

Hedwig Dances pushes boundaries by working within them.

Chicago Magazine "For example, designer Sanja Manakoski has created white shrouds to envelop one of the performers like a cocoon while real-time images (created by video designer John Boesche) are projected onto his body."

KLASA Fashion Brand